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ARIZONA REGULATOR is Veteran Marine Owned and Operated.  100% Made in America with American Materials. 

By Americans For Americans.

The ARIZONA REGULATOR is

Federal Legal Semi-Auto Fun.

Regulates one shot per single function of the trigger. 

In accordance with the U.S. Supreme Court decision of “single function of the trigger” for Semi-Auto Firearms in the ruling of

GARLAND v. CARGILL

U.S. 602 ____ 7 (2024)

LEADING THE NEW REVOLUTION

IN AMERICAN SMALL ARMS

5.56 AR and 9mm AR function videos

Click picture for part order page.  Additional info below and on 5.56 Tech and 9mm Tech pages.

Federal Legal Nationwide.

State Legal to own in 37 States.  

 

States we cannot ship to due to State restrictions.

CA, CT, DC, DE, FL, HI, IA, IL, MD, MN, NJ, NY, RI, WA.

 

Click and buy orders process and ship within a couple days.  We process and ship orders daily in order recieved.

 

We do not presell or take backorders.  When we take your click and buy order we have units on hand to fill the order.

 

Mail in orders available.

Click to Download Mail in Order Form.

Opens in new window.

 

Mail in orders on hand are filled before more units are added to the site for click and buy card orders.

“an accessory for a semiautomatic rifle that allows the shooter to rapidly reengage the trigger (and therefore achieve a high rate of fire)— converts the rifle into a “machinegun.”  We hold that it does not and therefore affirm.

 

GARLAND V. CARGILL 602 U.S. ____ , 7 (2024)

 

-----------------------

 

“As always, we start with the statutory text, which refers to “a single function of the trigger.” . . . ;

 

Webster’s New International Dictionary 2711 (2d ed. 1934) (“A piece, as a lever, connected with a catch or detent as a means of releasing it; specif., Firearms, the part of a lock moved by the finger to release the cock in firing”).

 

The phrase “function of the trigger” thus refers to the mode of action by which the trigger activates the firing mechanism. For most firearms, including the ones at issue here, the trigger is a curved metal lever.

 

On weapons with these standard trigger mechanisms, the phrase “function of the trigger” means the physical trigger movement required to shoot the firearm.”

 

GARLAND V. CARGILL 602 U.S. ____ , 7 (2024)

 

See Federal Legal page for more info. 

 

Mechanical Function from Patent Drawings

The ARIZONA REGULATOR is a Revolutionary Out of Battery Safety for the Semi-Auto AR Rifle and Pistol Platforms.

 

Federal Legal Semi-Auto function is accomplished by the use of a new technology known as multiple interface camming action.  This new and unique action provides an ultra smooth function along with perfect timing engineered in.  The end result allows for a full range of function and seamless feel when shooting your AR platform rifle or pistol in any situation.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR regulates one shot per single function of the trigger which allows you to have a lot of legal fun with your AR rifle or pistol.  The ARIZONA REGULATOR is designed, engineered, and intended to eliminate the ability for your AR to fire Out of Battery.  It works via the BCG engaging the mechanism when the bolt is out of battery.  When the bolt returns safely into battery the BCG disengages the mechanism allowing you to physically function the trigger again to fire the next shot.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR by means of its unique U.S. Patent Pending Design and Engineering still allows the hammer to interact with the disconnector as is normal in a Semi-Auto firing cycle and makes the trigger reengage the hammer between shots thus increasing overall safety of the firearm while requiring you to maintain a Federal Legal Semi-Auto cycle of the trigger for each shot you fire.  Faster than a Bump Stock and different than an FRT Forced Reset Trigger.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR is a direct engagement system that is constructed of aircraft grade aluminum with heat treated tool steel cams, Mil-Spec stainless steel axis pins and an aerospace grade top cam buffer.  The engineering and construction gives the ARIZONA REGULATOR a robust function and ultimate reliability.  Long term durability and reliability is our number one priority.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR is fast and easy to put in and take out of your AR rifle or pistol making it a very handy part of your kit to say the least.  Once setup simply pop rear take down pin, tip open receiver, put ARIZONA REGULATOR in, tip receiver closed, push rear take down pin back into place.

 

This makes the ARIZONA REGULATOR the best solution as it differs from a traditional FRT Forced Reset Trigger pack or any other FRT like item.  Unlike a traditional FRT Forced Rest Trigger pack or FRT like item you do not need to carry tools and extra parts to change out when you want to use it or to take it out when you don't want to use it.  Giving you the ultimate in flexibility to fit your needs.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR does not change the external appearance of your AR platform rifle or pistol. It pops in and out in seconds with no tools required at the range or in the field.  When you do not want to use it you can put it in your shirt pocket and easily put it back into your AR when you want to use it.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR was Invented, Engineered, and Developed by J.D. of Original Precision. J.D. is a U.S. Marine Corps Veteran with over 25 years Machining Experience, and has been in the gun parts market since 2017 when he released his World Famous LOCK DELETE for Smith & Wesson Revolvers followed by the release of the CCW HD Moon Clips for S&W J-Frame 38/357 Revolvers which are renowned in the Snub Nose Carry and Competition circles.

 

We are a proud member of the National Association for Gun Rights (NAGR).  https://nationalgunrights.org/ 

The U.S. Supreme Court has confirmed what We The People already knew by reading the plain text of the Law.

 

Each time the trigger moves and releases the hammer, that is a single function of the trigger. As well as the requirement of manual movement of the trigger to release the hammer does not satisfy the definition of automatic.

 

The ARIZONA REGULATOR does not make the gun automatic nor does it allow you to fire more than one shot per single function of the trigger.

 

The required conditions of the Federal Law for something to be a machinegun, "automatically" and more than one shot "by a single function of the trigger" are not met by the ARIZONA REGULATOR.

 

Both conditions, "automatically" and more than one shot "by a single function of the trigger" must be met for something to be a machinegun.

 

Therefore the ARIZONA REGULATOR is not and cannot be a machinegun in accordance with the U.S. Supreme Court and Federal Law.

 

Staying within the Law as J.D. was inventing and developing the ARIZONA REGULATOR is what has allowed us to bring this Out of Battery Safety into existence so you can have Federal Legal Semi-Auto fun with your AR-15. 

Some of the most important sections of the Landmark U.S Supreme Court decision are excerpted below.

 

We all owe Michael Cargill and GOA  Gun Owners of America a debt of gratitude for fighting the good fight and prevailing in this monumentous case.  https://www.gunowners.org/

 

These sections confirm the ARIZONA REGULATOR is a Federal Legal Semi-Auto item.


Page locations follow quote.

 

Full doc is well worth the read.

 

Click to read direct from U.S. Supreme Court site.

Opens in new window.

 

 

GARLAND V. CARGILL 602 U.S. _____ (2024)

 

JUSTICE THOMAS delivered the opinion of the Court.

 

“an accessory for a semiautomatic rifle that allows the shooter to rapidly reengage the trigger (and therefore achieve a high rate of fire)— converts the rifle into a “machinegun.”  We hold that it does not and therefore affirm.”

@  pg 1

 

“With a machinegun, a shooter can fire multiple times, or even continuously, by engaging the trigger only once.  This capability distinguishes a machinegun from a semiautomatic firearm. With a semiautomatic firearm, the shooter can fire only one time by engaging the trigger.”

@  pg 2

 

“As always, we start with the statutory text, which refers to “a single function of the trigger.” . . . ; Webster’s New International Dictionary 2711 (2d ed. 1934) (“A piece, as a lever, connected with a catch or detent as a means of releasing it; specif., Firearms, the part of a lock moved by the finger to release the cock in firing”).  The phrase “function of the trigger” thus refers to the mode of action by which the trigger activates the firing mechanism.  For most firearms, including the ones at issue here, the trigger is a curved metal lever.  On weapons with these standard trigger mechanisms, the phrase “function of the trigger” means the physical trigger movement required to shoot the firearm.”

@  pg 7

 

“is not a machinegun because it fires only one shot per “function of the trigger.”  That is, engaging the trigger a single time will cause the firing mechanism to discharge only one shot.  To understand why, it is helpful to consider the mechanics of the firing cycle for a semiautomatic rifle. Because the statutory definition is keyed to a “function of the trigger,” only the trigger assembly is relevant for our purposes. . . . When the shooter engages the trigger by moving it backward (as indicated by the arrow), the square point of the trigger pivots downward and out of the notch securing the hammer. Ibid.  This movement releases the spring-loaded hammer, allowing it to swing forward. Ibid.  At the top of the hammer’s rotation, it strikes the firing pin, causing the weapon to fire a single shot. See ibid.”

@  pg 7-8-9

 

“the hammer slips off the disconnector just as the square point of the trigger rises into the notch on the hammer (circled above). Ibid.  The trigger mechanism is thereby reset to the original position shown in Figure 1.  A semiautomatic rifle must complete this cycle for each shot fired. ATF does not dispute that this complete process is what constitutes a “single function of the trigger.”  A shooter may fire the weapon again after the trigger has reset, but only by engaging the trigger a second time and thereby initiating a new firing cycle. . . . “Any additional shot fired after one cycle is the result of a separate and distinct “function of the trigger.”“

@  pg 11 - 12

 

“merely reduces the amount of time that elapses between separate “functions” of the trigger.” . . . “makes it easier for the shooter to” . . . “thereby release pressure from the trigger and reset it.”

@  pg 12

 

“This argument rests on the mistaken premise that there is a difference between a shooter flexing his finger to pull the trigger and a shooter pushing the firearm forward to bump the trigger against his stationary finger.  ATF and the dissent seek to call the shooter’s initial trigger pull a “function of the trigger” while ignoring the subsequent “bumps” of the shooter’s finger against the trigger before every additional shot. But, §5845(b) does not define a machinegun based on what type of human input engages the trigger—whether it be a pull, bump, or something else. Nor does it define a machinegun based on whether the shooter has assistance engaging the trigger.  The statutory definition instead hinges on how many shots discharge when the shooter engages the trigger.  And, as we have explained, a semiautomatic rifle will fire only one shot each time the shooter engages the trigger . . . ”

@  pg 13

 

“But, Congress did not write a statutory definition of “machinegun” keyed to when a firing sequence begins and ends.  Section 5845(b) asks only whether a weapon fires more than one shot “by a single function of the trigger.” “

@  pg 14

 

“ Section 5845(b) asks whether a weapon “shoots . . . automatically more than one shot . . . by a single function of the trigger.”  The statute thus specifies the precise action that must “automatically” cause a weapon to fire “more than one shot”—a “single function of the trigger.”  If something more than a “single function of the trigger” is required to fire multiple shots, the weapon does not satisfy the statutory definition.”

@  pg 14 – 15

 

“But, even if one aspect of a weapon’s operation could be seen as “automatic,” that would not mean the weapon “shoots . . . automatically more than one shot . . . by a single function of the trigger.” §5845(b) (emphasis added).  After all, many weapons have some “automatic” features. For example, semiautomatic rifles eject the spent cartridge from the firearm’s chamber and load a new one in its place without any input from the shooter.  See supra, at 10.  A semiautomatic rifle is therefore “automatic” in the general sense that it performs some operations that would otherwise need to be completed by hand.  But, as all agree, a semiautomatic rifle cannot fire more than one shot “automatically . . . by a single function of the trigger” because the shooter must do more than simply engage the trigger one time. . . .  Thus, even if a semiautomatic rifle could fire more than one shot by a single function of the trigger, it would not do so “automatically.”“

@  pg 17

 

“So, ATF reasons, concluding that bump stocks are lawful “simply because the [trigger] moves back and forth . . . would exalt artifice above reality and enable evasion of the federal machinegun ban.” Id., at 41–42 (internal quotation marks omitted).  The dissent endorses a similar view. See post, at 14–17.  The presumption against ineffectiveness cannot do the work that ATF and the dissent ask of it.  A law is not useless merely because it draws a line more narrowly than one of its conceivable statutory purposes might suggest.”

@  pg 18

 

“In any event, Congress could have linked the definition of “machinegun” to a weapon’s rate of fire, as the dissent would prefer.  But, it instead enacted a statute that turns on whether a weapon can fire more than one shot “automatically . . . by a single function of the trigger.” §5845(b).  And, “it is never our job to rewrite . . . statutory text under the banner of speculation about what Congress might have done.”  Henson v. Santander Consumer USA Inc., 582 U. S. 79, 89 (2017). 9 III 

For the foregoing reasons, we affirm the judgment of the Court of Appeals.  It is so ordered.”

@  pg 19